TTS League Season 6 Top Cut Analysis

Visual Guide to Way of the Force Spoilers

With Way of the Force being just about a week old, we haven’t had many opportunities to see what the early meta may look like. Sure, we had a few Store Championships last weekend, but most of those are small, local events, and don’t give a full picture.

However, the top 32 cut for Season Six of the Tabletop Simulator League just closed this week, so now we have 30 (Two players missed the deadline for deck list submission) competitive deck lists to analyze! Now, in the interest of fairness, I will not be posting anyone else’s exact deck list (the lists are open for competitors, but I don’t want to make any public in case the owner doesn’t want that), but there is still plenty of fun data to look at!

And, of course, I’ll post my list at the bottom and talk a little bit about some of the choices I made and general strategy for the deck.

Without further ado, let’s break it down…

Character Pairings

Let’s start with a nice, simple list of the character pairings used.

  • 5x eThrawn/eSnoke
  • 4x eYoda/eLeia
  • 3x eKylo2/ePryce
  • 2x eBoba/eSeventh Sister
  • 2x eCad Bane/eSnoke
  • 2x eTarkin/eAphra
  • 1x eDooku/eTalzin
  • 1x eFinn2/eCassian
  • 1x eFinn2/eMaz/Long Term
  • 1x eLuke3/eAayla
  • 1x ePlo Koon/Padawan/Padawan
  • 1x ePoe2/eCassian
  • 1x eRey2/eAayla/Fortify
  • 1x eSabine/Clone Trooper
  • 1x eYoda/eCassian
  • 1x eYoda/eEzra/Rookie Pilot
  • 1x eYoda/eLuke3
  • 1x eBoba/ePhasma

Outside of the character pairings, here is a list of the most common cards used throughout the 30 deck lists:

TTS League Top Cards

CardSum
Force Illusion43
Hidden Motive28
Overconfidence23
Ancient Lightsaber22
Doubt22
Force Speed19
Feel Your Anger16
Suppressive Fire16
Chance Cube15
Friends in Low Places15
Pacify15
Dagger of Mortis14
He Doesn't Like You14
Holdout Blaster14
Mind Trick14
Probe14
Close Quarters Assault12
Hidden Blaster12
X-8 Night Sniper12

The first thing that stands out to me is the amount of Force Illusions used in the top cut. Not that anyone should be surprised, since Force Illusion has been a staple in pretty much every blue deck since it was printed.

Even so, 43 copies of Force Illusion is insane. One deck has a single copy, and 21 decks have two copies each. That means 73.33% of all submitted decks have at least one copy of Force Illusion!

The next thing that jumps out to me is 16 copies of Suppressive Fire. Jimmy and I talked about this card on Episode 103 of the Sons of Mandalore podcast, and I think it’s one of the strongest cards in the set. If you’re running hero red, this is an auto include, but the cool thing about this is that means that 8 players are running hero red! What a time to be alive.

My Deck

OK let’s get down to the nitty gritty and talk about the deck I chose to bring to the top cut. I decided to bring a deck that I’ve been messing around with quite a bit, and it turned out to be the most popular pairing in the tournament: Thrawn/Snoke. Here’s the list (click to view on swdestinydb)

I chose this list for a few reasons. First, if you’ve ever listened to our podcast, you know I love me some Thrawn. So having a good partner for him makes me really happy. Second, this is the WotF deck I’ve played the most, as it was also one of the first ones I tested as spoilers were being released. Finally, it’s really freaking good!

There are a couple things I may already know I want to change with the list overall, but it’s pretty close to where I want it. For context, the deadline for deck submission was approaching, and I had to make some last minute swaps before it was too late. But enough set up, let’s talk about some of the card decisions:

Hailfire Droid Tank – I see a lot of Thrawn/Snoke lists omit this card, but it is BONKERS good. This is one of my top targets for my opening mulligan, and if I get it out turn one, the extra indirect damage really helps over the course of the game. Not to mention the fact that it has four damage sides.

Z-95 Headhunter – This may seem like an odd choice, as it isn’t the strongest or most efficient vehicle out there. However, it is a cheap vehicle that triggers the Hailfire Tank as well as Planetary Bombardment, and I always have the money for the pay sides. As I tweak the list more, I’m considering swapping one of these out for a Kylo Ren’s Starfighter, as another solid 2 drop that doubles as a decent tech against mono colored decks.

Beguile – I. Love. This. Card. I’ve raved about this card a bunch already, but it’s just great, flexible, multi-dice mitigation. Two cost is harder for most decks, but not this one.

Feel Your Anger – This is a pretty standard card, so wouldn’t normally warrant it’s own explanation. However, if I had a chance to resubmit, I would probably make this a 1-of and add something in its place, given how situational it can be. The truth is I was panicking with the submission deadline approaching, so I added a second copy just to complete the list.

General Strategy/Tips

On the surface, the deck seems pretty straightforward. And, at it’s most basic level, it is. The goal is simple: Get Thrawn on a 2 resource side, Snoke that die, get a chance cube on Snoke, resolve tons of resources, play tons of big vehicles, win. Of course, as is true of most decks in Destiny, there are many nuances to the deck that you pick up by playing it over time.

The most obvious place to start is with Thrawn himself. I often hear people say things like “Always call 1 and take their mitigation”. While this is certainly a strong strategy, I would argue that most people aren’t as flexible with Thrawn as they should be. Yes, taking away mitigation is amazing for this deck in particular, so that you can focus to max damage freely, but there are situations that warrant other strategies. Two examples come to mind.

Let’s say your Boba/Seventh opponent went first and spent both of their resources on an Ancient Lightsaber, leaving them with no resources. You should call zero with your Thrawn activation. Not only can you target good removal like He Doesn’t Like You, but there are other powerful cards you can remove, such as Bait and Switch. This situation is probably the most obvious example.

The other common situation is playing against a fast yellow hero deck like Sabine. I find myself calling 3 fairly often in this matchup, because letting them roll in, resolve, and then Hyperspace Jump is absolutely backbreaking.

The bottom line here is before you activate Thrawn, think to yourself, “Is there anything my opponent could do this round that would wreck my gameplan? What is the worst thing I can see in their hand?” If you think of something that you know you need to play around, don’t hesitate to call that number and guarantee safety.

The next piece of advice I would give is to play a round ahead. There have been a few times where I had the option to focus one of my vehicle dice to an extra damage or two by flipping to the pay side, which would have left me with no resources at the end of the round. Meanwhile Thrawn was dead and I have a Dark Ritual in my hand. In this case, I’ll often sacrifice a few damage to try and finish the round with three resources, guaranteeing I can play the Dark Ritual at the start of the next round.

I’m sure I will be tweaking this list even more as time goes on, but for now I’m pretty happy with how it’s been performing. I ended up with a “bye” in the first round of the tournament, as my opponent missed the deck submission deadline, but I’ll be sure to let you all know how I do in the next round.


And that about wraps up our summary of the TTS League Top 32 cut tournament. I’m excited to see how the bracket progresses!

What do you think of the early view of the Way of the Force meta? Is Thrawn/Snoke the real deal? Is my decklist trash? Let me know in the comments below!

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